Mosaics

The mosaics are made from glass and ceramic tiles set into cement based adhesive and grouted. The ‘Found Segments’ series have additional plaster areas.
The ‘Insect’ series are on pre-cast concrete sections with a depth of approx. 30mm. These are suitable for any outdoor location such as patios, ponds and paths; ideal as garden or conservatory pieces.
All other mosaics are on board. These are suitable for any indoor location and sheltered outdoor walls.
Please note that the tiles have a far more intense colour than can be reproduced here. This is especially true of the glass tiles.

This gallery contains a selection of mosaics currently held in stock, giving a taster of different styles and content available.

All of the mosaics pictured here are for sale; please e-mail Russell to check for availability, commissions are accepted. Dimensions in mm.

Mosaics/private commissions
Garden patio

2m x 2.4m   ceramic tile on concrete

PatioThis substantial outdoor mosaic was made in thirty 400mm square sections laid onto a concrete base. The design incorporates images of local flora, references to the clients background and historical detail of the house and it’s location. A very patio-1unique and personal piece, patio-1which illustrates how the client can be totally involved in the concept and design.

 

 

patio-detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peacocks and Vase with grapes

Ceramic and glass tile on board

DeckingA classic Roman themed panel for a sheltered decking area of a private house. Mosaics such as this can be permanently fixed onto brick work or on to plywood panels which are then fixed to the wall. Glass tiles are particularly effective around and in water features where the light reflects the rich depth of colour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black and white ceramic tile depicting sea life

black-and-white
Mosaic is installed on to marine ply and screwed to the existing floor boards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shop entrance

shop
 

 

 
Repair and conservation to existing Victorian mosaic. Before and after images of work carried out on this shop entrance mosaic

Minotaur Maze

Minotaur_mazeA large park mosaic designed and produced with the help of  local people in the form of a game based on Theseus and the Minotaur. The outer border  is made up of tiles made by school children

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toast Mosaic – world record attempt 2005

toast1Two whole days of toasting were needed to turn the 1000’s of bread slices into three tones: burnt, toasted, and lightly toasted. Tiring, hot and crumb filled work made doubly difficult with the canteen smoke alarm going off every 30 minutes.

Using the Town Hall Square as our venue the design was marked out on sheets of polythene bounded by an 8m x 22m wooden frame. The adhesive for the toast was Gooseberry Jam, way past it’s sell by date: everything became very sticky.

It took five people 8 hours to cut and assemble the mosaic toast  ‘tiles’ battling with a gradually increasing flock of pigeons and disgruntled members of the public convinced that we were wasting ‘Good Food’. Actually we were sustaining the local wildlife and any way all of the bread was destined for the bin before we got our hands on it.

toast-4
 

 

 

 

 

 

The World Record lasted a matter of weeks but was a great launch event for the 2005 Chester Food Festival.

Schools
Bottle Top Mosaic – World Record attempt 2006

Bottle_top_mosaic_1We were outdone before we started this one. A group in Germany managed to fill a football pitch with a bottle top picture and it was too late for us to better that. However we carried on and by working with some 20 local schools and groups managed a very sizeable mosaic to launch the 2006 Food Festival.

The mosaic design was transferred on to 135 plywood boards that were then distributed around our schools. Each ‘team’ was given a large bag of bottle tops, PVA and instructions and given a week to finish. On completion the boards were transported to the Town Hall Square and assembled on site.

The 24m x 7m mosaic contained approx. 200,000 bottle tops.

mosaic-bottle-tops

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